Robbery

When you are accused of a robbery charge, you are accused of a violent criminal offense. Because of this, it can seem like the police and the prosecutor aren’t really interested in being nice to you, or even in hearing your side of the story. It’s during times like this that it pays to have someone on your side, an advocate working on your behalf.

Because the stakes are high, and you are facing possibly prison time, a criminal defense attorney can be a true asset. Working to protect your constitutional rights and ensure you get the best results possible in court, we can aggressively pursue your best interests.

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The laws of Oregon can seem quite complex and confusing. While this site provides a general overview of the charges and potential penalties, discussing your case one on one with an attorney is the best way to know for certain what you are up against.

Oregon Robbery Laws and Penalties

Under Oregon statutes, robbery is separated into three different classifications. The charge you face will not only depend on the facts of your case, but on the evidence available to the prosecutor.

Third Degree Robbery

Robbery in the 3rd degree is where we find the state’s basic robbery definition. You could be facing this charge if you are accused of committing or attempting to commit theft or unauthorized use of a vehicle by using or threatening use of force in the process. This offense is classified as a Class C Felony and carries up to 5 years in prison and $125,000 in fines.

Second Degree Robbery

If you are accused of committing a robbery, as defined in 3rd degree robbery, and you represent by word or actions that you are armed or if you are aided by another person in the commission of the offense, you could face 2nd degree robbery charges. This offense is considered a Class B Felony and carries up to 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines.

First Degree Robbery

If you are believed to have committed robbery, as defined in 3rd degree robbery, and you are armed with a deadly weapon, you use or attempt to use a dangerous weapon, or if you cause or attempt to cause serious physical injury to someone, you could face this, the most serious of robbery charges.

Robbery in the 1st degree is classified as a Class A Felony charge and carries a potential 20 years in prison and $375,000 in fines.

All robbery charges are serious. If you are accused of any one of these offenses, contact our offices for a free consultation on your case.

 

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